Wednesday, 15 October 2014

The Vallum Award for Poetry 2014 WINNERS!


2014 WINNERS



1st PRIZE: $750

ALEXEI PERRY
“The Long Study”
(Canada)

2nd PRIZE: $250 

CARLA BARKMAN
“Last evening I stumbled”
(Canada) 

HONOURABLE MENTIONS:

SUSAN HUGHSON
“Apple to Apple”
(Canada)

DOMENICO CAPILONGO
“pass this note”
(Canada)


Thank you to everyone who entered this year's contest.
Winning poems will appear in issue 12:1 "Surrender."


To view poems of previous winners, please visit our website HERE

 

Eleni Zisimatos reviews Mark Morgenstern's film, "Before I Go" (EWOLA Cinema).


“BEFORE I GO,” Mark Morgenstern, Ewola Cinema, 2014.
Reviewed by Eleni Zisimatos, Vallum Magazine, 2014.


Mark Morgenstern’s film, “Before I Go,” in competition at the Festival du nouveau cinema, and which premiered at Cinema du Parc in Montreal October 12th, is about the movements of a house. It is not a ‘home,’ there are no puppies or kittens or soft fluffy images. The cinematography is bleak. There is focus on parts of the house requiring repair. But it would seem that the most central part of this strange, haunting, is the house’s need for attention. Although it is dismembered and dismantled, there are figures who appear as fragments, figures who would seem to belong there, but who have no identity, as they are portrayed in the film. There is a disconnect between the physicality of the house and the physicality of the human forms. It is almost as if the two are caught in some kind of disparagement of time—and they cannot communicate. The ‘house’ is often considered to be symbolically associated with the psyche. Bachelard has written on the importance of the home and how it is central to one’s conception of identity. Morgenstern shows us the house and he shows us some human forms, but there is no relationship between the two. The house is not a home, in Bachelard’s interpretation of home. So, what is this house we observe, so closely, so fearfully?

Morgenstern’s technical brilliance and associative cinematography are so impressive that one is left breathless. The house is trying to speak—is it a haunted house? It very well could be. The most chilling part of this film is towards the end, with a woman sitting on a bed, with her back towards us. She could easily be construed to be some kind of ghost or figure of madness. We seem to drift with this woman’s presence, and this is a key point in the film where I felt a truly dangerous ‘presence.’ The house needs attention. The psyche would seem to be unraveling.

The magnificence of this short film is that it creates the aura of exteriority. We are not inside it, even though we view inside the physical house. And this is what many family houses are like in today’s soulless and mindless societies. Morgenstern’s, “Before I Go,” is a cutting-edge portrayal of the breakdown of the family unit, of the suffering of individuals who try to create community and communion within their houses, but fail. And the true horror is that families today--no longer within a caring and nurturing environment or a home—are transformed into objects in an essentially mad series of unconnected pieces and parts. This is the stunning force behind this film.

Tuesday, 30 September 2014

Poem by L. Wayne Russell

TRANSGRESSIONS
(C) L.W. Russell 2014


The world’s soul has gone incognito
as the devil incarnate.

Angels lay stagnant at the bottom
of my shot glass.

In between inaudible words are
spoken, air bubbles surface; frantic.

The cries of angels begin to fade.
One by one a begging ghost can be
seen cutting through the lukewarm
surface of my straight bourbon.

And now I know, what was pure in
my life has become no more.

The angels lie in the bottom of their
liquid coffin, wings motionless,
voices silent.

Father forgive me, for I have sinned...

again and again and again....

I cannot seem to stop this madness!

help me...

the angels have but all disappeared from
my life...

One by one by one they go, sinking into
the depths of a past that they can never
come back from.


* for all those I have lost to alcohol, may you rest in eternal peace*

Tuesday, 16 September 2014

Vallum Award for Poetry 2014: Shortlist Announced!


2014 SHORTLIST


RHONDA COLLIS
“Life Cycle in C Major”
(Canada)

SUSAN HUGHSON
“Apple to Apple”
(Canada)

DIANE TUCKER
“The Unseen Desert” 
(Canada)

JAMES F. OLWELL
“Dream Upon, Jimmy Alexis, Stillborn” 
(Canada)

CARLA BARKMAN
“Last evening I stumbled”
(Canada) 

DOMENICO CAPILONGO
“pass this note” 
(Canada)

MELANIE SWETZ
“My Mother’s Magazines” 
(Turkey)

ALEXEI PERRY
“The Long Study”
(Canada)

STEPHEN CALDWELL WRIGHT
“Lessons From A Younger Brother” 
(USA)


Thank you to everyone who entered this year's contest.
The winners and honorable mentions will be announced mid-October
Winning poems will appear in issue 12:1 "Surrender."

Thursday, 11 September 2014

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS!




Vallum's next issue's theme is SURRENDER:

What does it mean to bend, to yield? Surrender manifests in different ways: joy, despair, a willingness to give up one’s “totality” for someone or something other than him or her self. We surrender to vices, to glory, to the divine, or to the void. How do you “surrender?” Send us your best poems!

DEADLINE:  November 1, 2014

For more information and guidelines, please visit us online:

Tuesday, 2 September 2014

JUST RELEASED: "A REMARKABLE GREY HORSE" poems by Thurston Moore + John Kinsella !




NOW AVAILABLE!!!  A Remarkable Grey Horse -- a collaborative poetry chapbook by THURSTON MOORE (musician and founder of experimental rock group SONIC YOUTH) and JOHN KINSELLA (author of over 30 books of poetry, fiction, and criticism)!

"Celebrating in the unnatural, reveling in the rebellious, A Remarkable Grey Horse is a collision of skateboards, Doris Day, punk rock, lighthouses, spume, skuzz, and Rimbaud. Here, bleak cityscapes, squalid apartments, and polluted waters urge the reader to 'explore disgust' and seek freedom."

ORDER YOURS NOW!
http://vallummag.com/ccorder.htm